Updating boot partitions for the volume as required

Unfortunately, formatting errors can happen even if you've just been using your computer in a normal way, so even though your system may be running fine at the moment, it can only benefit from a regular drive check.

One way to do this is to simply reboot your system into Safe mode periodically, which among some other built-in maintenance tasks will run the "fsck" command-line tool to check the hard drive for errors and repair them if found.

You can look this up by running the command "diskutil list" to show the available devices and their respective device IDs.

For the second command, VOLUME is some name that will target the boot partition itself, instead of the drive. The first is to use the name of the boot volume, which should be surrounded by quotes if there are spaces in it (or you can properly escape the space characters with a backslash before them).

The updated app now presents a streamlined appearance while retaining all of its former functionality, and it’s still useful for verifying or repairing disks.With both of these selected, click the Verify Disk button and the system will check the partition tables and formatting of the drive.Do note that checking the hard drive will pause writing to it, and since the system is continuously writing and updating data on the drive, this may result in the system hanging for a few seconds while the checking routines run, so do not be alarmed if you see the spinning color wheel cursor and cannot perform other tasks while this routine is going on.While periodic maintenance of your Mac is usually not necessary to keep it running in top shape, one exception is periodically checking your hard drive for errors.If your Mac's hard drive is experiencing formatting errors, then the system may show slowdowns, failures to properly save or read data, and even file corruption, and eventually it may not even boot.

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